Loans

FD4Cast calculates interest and repayments on loans, based on the information you enter into the model.

5.1.1 ENTERING LOANS

To enter loan information, go to Finance > Loans.

Loan Items: On the left hand side of the screen (orange region) we see different loan items. These belong to the Loans category which can be added as shown at  1.4.2 Add/Remove Category Rows and renamed as shown at 1.5 Admin Sheet. (You cannot model a new loan on the same line as an existing loan which appears on your Opening Balance Sheet, and therefore will need to create a new line in the category of Loans)

New Loan Inputs: At this section on the top (green region) we can input new loans in the month that loan is drawn. Please note that, this section is for new loans only. All existing loans drawn before the financial period start should be entered in the opening balance (See: 2.1 Opening Balance)

Loan Repayment Inputs: This section on the bottom of the screenshot (blue region) is used to indicate monthly repayments of loans.

Repayments of new and existing loans should be entered here to be taken into account for cash flow and other financial statements. In the example below, you can see both the repayment of new and existing loans:

After you input loans and repayments, the outputs will be automatically reflected in the reports below:

5.1.2 ENTERING LOAN INTERESTS

Loan interests can be input either  as a percentage or an absolute value as shown below:

Interest rate percentages can be input per month to the second table in the screenshot above.

The common method is to use percentages for loan interest calculations. So, the default value for Manual (absolute) loans is FALSE. However, in some cases the user may want to input absolute values per month for interest calculation. In this case:

After making the inputs, these interest payments are reflected on the reports which affect both P&L and Cash Flow Statements as seen below:

5.1.3 Amounts Falling Due Within a Year

You also have the option to define months for distributing loans effect to balance sheet. Using the same figures from previous examples, you can see below the effect of changes for two different scenarios: